UConn Alumnus Gives TEDx Talk

Dr. Matthew Guberman-Pfeffer, a UConn alumnus and current postdoctoral researcher at Yale University, is an accomplished chemist with a unique perspective on the molecular makings of our world. He also happens to be blind. In his TEDx Talk, he shares his story of resilience and how he learned to comprehend a subject that is typically taught by visuals in the classroom.

Matthew Guberman-Pfeffer

 

Watch his TEDx talk here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFwJuGP2LPg

UConn Recognized As Top Producer of Fulbright Scholars

The University of Connecticut has been recognized among the top producers of Fulbright U.S. Scholars from research institutions for the second time in the past four years.

The University has six Fulbright Scholars on its faculty who are teaching and performing research around the world in the 2019-20 academic year, according to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, which was featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education on Monday.

The Fulbright Program is the government’s flagship international educational exchange program. Scholars are selected for their academic merit and leadership potential, with the opportunity to exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program operates in more than 125 countries. The following UConn faculty are pursuing Fulbright projects abroad:

  • Associate Professor of Sociology Matthew Hughey, will conduct research on “White Racial Identity, Organizational Homogeneity, and Stratification of Benefits in Surrey” at the University of Surrey in Guildford, England.
  • Professor of Chemistry Challa Kumar, will conduct research on “BioNanoMaterials for Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) of Biobatteries” at the University of Wollongong in Wollongong, Australia.
  • Professor of Painting in the School of Fine Arts Kathryn Myers, will lecture in “Professional Practices for Studio Artists” at Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi, India.
  • Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Malaquias Pena-Mendez, will conduct research on “Ensemble Predictions for Urban Areas” at the Federal University of Alagoas in Maceio, Brazil.
  • Associate Professor of English Bhakti Shringarpure, will conduct research on “The World Novel from Africa: Mapping Migrant Forms in East African Literature” at the University of Nairobi in Nairobi, Kenya.
  • Associate Professor of Marine Sciences Michael Whitney, will conduct research on “The Icelandic River Influences on Coastal and Open Ocean Waters” at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik, Iceland.

UConn’s Office of National Scholarships & Fellowships collaborated with the Office of Global Affairs and the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute to host Fulbright Week at UConn for the first time in 2019.

This year, Fulbright Week at UConn events will be held April 13-17, 2020. Together with a representative from the Institute of International Education, which administers the Fulbright programs, information sessions for faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students will be offered, along with one-on-one faculty advising sessions with the IIE representative, a live session with a current Fulbright student abroad, and a reception for current and former UConn Fulbright Scholars.

The Fulbright Program is funded through an annual appropriation by the United States Congress to the Department of State. Participating governments and host institutions, corporations, and foundations in foreign countries and the U.S. also provide direct and indirect support.


Article courtesy of UConn Today

Across the Pond and Back: Chemical Biology in Edinburgh, Scotland

Eric Mohan-University of Edinburgh Photos
Eric Mohan, Chemistry Department, UConn. Summer 2019: University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Undergraduate student Eric Mohan ’20 (CLAS), recipient of an Office of Undergraduate Research award, shares his experience conducting research abroad.

“I am the recipient of the 2019 Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) award, and I had the privilege of spending last summer in the laboratory of Professor Dominic Campopiano, in the School of Chemistry at the prestigious University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom. This was an amazing experience to work with a renowned professor helping solve an unmet and urgent medical need related to the resurgence of antibiotic resistance. My project focused on the inhibition of an important enzyme found in many infectious bacteria, such as those causing Tuberculosis. I was tasked with synthesizing, modeling, and characterizing the pathway by which a compound, ERG240, blocked the branch chain amino acid aminotransferase enzyme. I used optically active coupled reactions in this work. We then co-crystallized the inhibitor with the enzyme and employed x-ray crystallography to fully understand the mechanism of the enzyme. My research was presented as a poster at the Fall Frontiers program 2019 at UConn, Storrs. Continue reading

Research Safety Workshop

The Department of Chemistry held their 2020 Research Safety Workshop for first year graduate students and Laboratory Safety Officers (LSOs) on Wednesday, January 15.  The Workshop was organized by the Department Safety Committee and the Joint Safety Team (JST) in conjunction with EH&S. Presentations were made by Dr. Jing Zhao (Chair of the Department Safety Committee), Jessica A. Martin (Head of JST), Eric Krantz (Head of Teaching Laboratory Services), and Brent Lewchik (Chemical Safety Manager, EH&S).  In all, 44 students were in attendance. A survey revealed that the vast majority of attendees found the material covered to be useful.

Continue reading

Nature Communications Paper Publishing

Enzymes provide optimal three-dimensional structures for substrate binding and the subsequent accelerated reaction. Such folding-dependent catalytic behaviors, however, are seldom mechanistically explored with reduced structural complexity. A recent article in Nature Communications, from collaborated research between Professor Jianjun Cheng at UIUC and Professor Yao Lin at UConn, demonstrates that the α-helix, a much simpler structural motif of enzymes, can facilitate its own growth through the self-catalyzed polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) in solvents with low dielectric constants. The leading authors with equal contributions are Ziyuan Song (UIUC), Hailin Fu (UConn) and Ryan Baumgartner (UIUC). In the paper, Hailin Fu developed a new two-stage polymerization kinetics involving a Michaelis-Menton mechanism, which helped to prove the auto-catalytic nature of the NCA polymerizations. The research was facilitated by funding from the National Science Foundation (CHE-1709820 to J.C. and DMR-1809497 to Y.L.). The editors at Nature Communications featured the article in the Editors’ Highlights of recent research on Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology (https://www.nature.com/collections/wdzvyhgxft/content/prabhjot-saini).

Molecular diagrams
Photo courtesy of: Nature Communications

Song, Z., Fu, H., Baumgartner, R., Zhu, L., Shih, K.-C., Xia, Y., Zheng, X., Yin, L., Chipot, C.*, Lin, Y.* & Cheng, J.* Enzyme-mimetic self-catalyzed polymerization of polypeptide helices. Nature Communications 10, 5470 (2019). https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13502-w

Meet Professor J. Nathan Hohman

J. Nathan HohmanProfessor J. Nathan Hohman was drawn to chemistry from a young age. As a young teenager, he had a subscription to Popular Science and recalls reading – with great interest – about buckyballs and carbon nanotubes. He was especially drawn to the patterns of connectivity and strength and properties of these unique materials. By his 10th grade chemistry class, Hohman was certain that he wanted to pursue a degree in chemistry. He completed his undergraduate studies at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana and went on to study under Professor Paul S. Weiss at Penn State for his Ph.D. From there, a sudden change in Weiss’s appointment led Hohman to complete his studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. From LA, Hohman moved his way up the West Coast, completing a postdoctoral research position in the Stanford University Materials Science and Engineering Department. Shortly after his post doc, he began working at the Molecular Foundry at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

After working for three years at the Molecular Foundry, Hohman realized he missed the world of academics and the joys of teaching students. He wanted to be closer to the faculty and students while experiencing the independence that comes from being a faculty member. Hohman chose UConn after searching for a university that would provide him the opportunity to teach and pursue his research interests. Continue reading

The First CT-Japan Photochemistry Workshop

On October 29th and 30th, UConn Chemistry held the first CT-JAPAN photochemistry workshop for high school students. The two-day workshop was held in conjunction with the visit of 5 high school students and 2 teachers of Matsuyama Minami High School from Ehime Prefecture, Japan. The total 50 high school students from Woodstock Academy attended the workshop. The workshop was organized by Prof. Tomoyasu Mani with the help from Prof. Fatma Selampinar and graduate assistants.

Group of high school students

The students from the two countries attended the lectures by Prof. Mani and afterwards jointly performed the experiments, learning new chemistry (photon upconversion on day 1 and charge-transfer absorption on day 2) and at the same time fostering friendship and cultural understanding. The agenda and the materials of the workshop (lecture slides and experiment procedures) are available online. The workshop was in part supported by the Department of Chemistry and Early College Experience. The trip of Matsuyama Minami High School was supported by the Japan Science and Technology through the Super Science High School program.

Professor Rusling Receives Commercialization Grants

Rusling

Professor Jim Rusling recently received START and SPARK Technology Commercialization Grants for Self-powered Bioelectronics.

Aiming to commercialize the world’s first battery-free implantable pacemaker, Professor Rusling and his team received two early-stage technology commercialization grants, START ($10K) and SPARK ($50K). Unlike current pacemakers which are battery-powered and require replacement surgery when the battery is drained, the new self-powered pacemaker uses nanogenerator technology to harvest the patient’s body energy and store it in a tiny biosupercapacitor to power pacemakers, potentially for the patient’s lifetime. Commercialization efforts of this product are led by VoltXon inc, a recent startup spun-off from Prof. Rusling’s research and led by Postdoctoral Fellow and CTO of VoltXon, Dr. Islam Mosa and graduate student Esraa Elsanadidy.

 

For more information about the START and SPARK technology commercialization grants please visit their program website.

UConn Chemistry Professor Receives NSF Grant

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded UConn Chemistry Professor José Gascón and Michigan State Professor Warren Beck a grant to study Carotenoid Photophysics in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting.

With this $590,000 award, the Chemistry of Life Processes Program in the Chemistry Division is funding Dr. Gascón (PI) and Dr. Beck (co-PI) to investigate the energy transfer and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in the proteins of photosynthetic organisms. Continue reading