Faculty News

Polymorphism in Benzene-1,3,5- Tricarboxamide Supramolecular Assemblies in Water

Dr. Yao Lin, Associate Professor of Chemistry/Polymer Program, and fellow collaborators were recently published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Below is a description of the research:

The control of reaching a specifically designed morphology in supramolecular assembly is one of the key aspects for future success in the area of supramolecular materials, As different structures can be formed by different pathways or by a temperature dependent polymorphism, novel strategies have to be established to obtain a desired structure in the resulting materials. Supported by an NSF CAREER grant and the “Research Opportunities in Europe for NSF CAREER Awardees,” Prof. Yao Lin got an opportunity to attack this challenge by working with Prof. Bert Meijer at the Eindhoven University of Technology. Together, they discovered that increased dynamics is required to provide enough flexibility of the system to form defect-free structures in water. Without this flexibility, the assemblies are frozen into a variety of structures that are very similar at the supramolecular level, but less defined at the mesoscopic level.

To read the full article, click here:

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.8b07697

 

Smart Phone Soup

In the bottom drawer of your desk at home lie all the “must-haves” of yesteryear — a bundle of knotted earphones, a broken computer mouse, some overplayed CDs, a flip phone, an iPod. A study in The Global E-waste Monitor 2017 reported that in 2016 humans generated 44.7 million metric tons of electronic waste (e-waste). And in that graveyard of a desk drawer, the basement, or a landfill, all these devices will rot for hundreds, even thousands, of years before degrading. The glass used in just one cell phone takes some 500 years to decompose.

But what if the future smartphones and tablets were made of edible materials? To chemistry professor Challa Kumar, a future where you can pop your cell phone in a pot of water, swirl it around, bring it to a boil, and have yourself a yummy iPhone stew is not science fiction but a future reality of his research in bionanotechnology, or what he calls “edible chemistry.”

Kumar and his team of graduate students created a white LED light from bovine serum albumin (BSA), a waste product of the meat industry. White LEDs are used in electronics like phones and TVs that emit white light from their screens. Kumar’s “hamburger protein” LEDs emit white light at a higher resolution than current LEDs and, says Kumar, “When you are done with the device, you could eat it.”

“We are the only group in the world doing this where both products and reactants are edible ­— to humans, plants, or bacteria,” he adds.

The team’s research has clinical significance, too. The edible LED also has inexpensive pH and glucose sensing capabilities. Combined with the team’s food-based batteries, these LEDs could replace current electronic glucose meters for diabetics.

Kumar also is exploring the possibility of using lipids from coconut oil to replace the toxic elements in current cancer cell–targeting treatments. He and his students believe the uses for edible chemistry are limitless, that it is the future of tech­nology as well as environmental awareness.

In the not-too-distant future, they say, we could be watching our favorite Netflix series on screens made from the same materials as last night’s burgers.

-Cara Williams ’18 (CLAS) courtesy of UConn Magazine

Accelerate UConn Winners

Dr.James Rusling with Postdoc, Islam Mosa and Grad Student Esraa Elsanadidy

Prof. James Rusling, Postdoctoral Fellow Islam Mosa, and Graduate Student Esraa Elsanadidy are the recipients of a Fall 2018 Accelerate UConn Grant for their project “Biocap-Harvest.” This project involves harvesting energy using nanogenerators and storing it to create standalone power systems for implantable, wearable, and portable electronics. All winning teams receive special training and a $3,000 seed grant. Accelerate UConn is the University’s National Science Foundation Innovation Corps (I-Corps) site aiming to catalyze innovation and entrepreneurship.

Neighboring Group Participation

Mark Peczuh, Toni Planas, and GroupFor Toni Planas, a sabbatical in rural Connecticut has accelerated a sweet collaboration with Mark Peczuh’s research group.

Carbohydrate chemists are readily familiar with the concept of neighboring group participation (NPG), where the electrons of a nearby functional group accelerate reactions at a given center. A sociological version of NPG operates in the everyday world of scientific collaborations. Antoni Planas (IQS, U. Ramon Llull, Barcelona) has just completed a year-long sabbatical at the University of Connecticut in the laboratory of collaborator Mark Peczuh. His close proximity to Peczuh and his research group has hastened the progress on their project to develop glycosidase enzymes that selectively hydrolyze septanose sugars, making Planas the human equivalent of a participatory neighboring group. Planas, who lived with his family in an old farmhouse on UConn’s main campus, previously hosted Peczuh as a Fulbright Fellow at IQS in 2013 – a visit that initiated the collaboration. Continue reading

UConn Researchers Win Patent

Lu & Kasi in lab
Xiuling Lu, (right) Assoc. Professor of Pharmaceutics and Rajeswari Kasi, (left) Assoc. Professor of Chemistry inside Lu’s lab.

When a researcher develops a drug that can help treat an illness, the next challenge they face is finding a way to actually get the drug delivered to the right location in a patient’s body in the right amount.

Two University of Connecticut professors have been granted a US Patent for a novel polymer they have designed to help deliver anti-cancer drugs to tumors. Rajeswari Kasi from the Department of Chemistry and Xiuling Lu from the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, both are affiliated with the polymer program within the Institute of Materials Science, have created a new copolymer that can self-assemble into nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. The nanoparticles can carry drugs and bio-responsively release drugs in cancer cells. Continue reading

Dr. Rusling Named Krenicki Professor

Rusling

On August 1st, 2018, the University of Connecticut Board of trustees approved Dr. James Rusling as the Paul Krenicki Professor of Chemistry.

The Paul Krenicki Professorship is possible with the support of John Krenicki Jr. '84 and Donna Samson Krenicki '84. The professorship is named after Krenicki's brother, Paul, who had a passion for chemistry but whose college career was cut short. Paul was bound for a career as a chemist, but died of cancer at age 22. The Paul Krenicki Professorship of Chemistry provides the Chemistry Department with a significant boost and will help bolster UConn's rising academic stature.

"To attract faculty, having these endowed professorships is a big deal. It's a big factor in terms of recruiting and retaining key faculty. It's a permanent commitment to the university. From where we sit, it's probably the best thing we can do to advance the university," said Krenicki, a longtime, generous donor to the University.

"This professorship will strengthen our Chemistry Department's already exceptional capacity to train undergraduates for science careers and to pursue research in fields like material science, biomedicine, and environmental sustainability. UConn undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty will all benefit from this gift for years to come, and for that we are truly grateful to them," said Jeremy Teitelbaum, former dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Professor Rusling was nominated for the inaugural Krenicki Chair by a search committee of his peers within the department. The nomination was based on his truly remarkable record of research and funding. Rusling came to UConn in 1979, and has authored more than 400 research publications and book chapters, in addition to mentoring 57 Ph.D. students and 36 postdoctoral fellows. He is currently the program director of two large multi-investigator NIH projects, one involving six Irish universities and another that targets new high throughput toxicity screening arrays. He has collaborated with numerous faculty over the years, both within UConn and externally. Professor Rusling is an example of a world-class researcher, dedicated educator, and engaged departmental member. We are proud to have such a truly deserving holder of this new chair within the ranks of our department.

Excerpts courtesy of Grace Merritt, UConn Foundation

UConn Chemist Wins Patent for Tunable Metal Oxide Synthesis Method

Altug Poyraz, left, a graduate student, with Steven Suib, distinguished professor and director of chemistry on Jan. 9, 2014. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

UConn chemistry professor Steven Suib has been granted a US patent (9,908,103) for a new method developed with his former student, Altug S. Poyraz, now an inorganic chemistry professor at Kennesaw State University. The technology is capable of synthesizing and customizing a type of compound that has unique catalytic and electronic properties.

Suib and Poyraz have patented their process for synthesizing thermally stable mesoporous transitional metal oxides. Their process also allows them to control the size of the mesopores and nano-sized crystalline walls.

Continue reading

Award Announcements

Two University of Connecticut Chemistry professors recently received Research Excellence Program (REP) awards. Dr. Eugene Pinkhassik recently received the award for his proposal, “Catch and Release of Nucleic Acids with Porous Nanocapsules.” Dr. Yao Lin was awarded for his proposal, “Mechanics of Processive Enzymes that Degrade Crystalline Polymers and Its Implications in Designing Macromolecular Machines.” Congratulations!